First-Year Learning Communities: Humanities

The Humanities First-Year Learning Community (FLC, pronounced "flick") is where you can discover research and writing norms in the humanities, think about different approaches to research and learn strategies to navigate University of Toronto Libraries. You will also build meaningful relationships with instructors, upper-year students and alumni from the humanities. 

Apply to the Humanities FLC

  • Application deadline: July 2, 2024 at 12 p.m. ET  
  • All successful applicants will be informed of their acceptance into the FLC program and receive further details by July 15, 2024.

Apply to a Humanities FLC

Eligibility

  • First-year students in the Faculty of Arts & Science who have been admitted to the Humanities admission category on the St. George campus
  • Students living off campus are encouraged to apply to the Humanities FLC

FLC Course Overview

By joining a FLC, you will have the opportunity to connect with a small group of students in regular FLC sessions and core first-year courses. Students in the Humanities FLC will meet at a welcome session during the first week of classes and then every week starting September 9, 2024.

In addition to your FLC sessions, you will select two of the following Humanities courses on your FLC application:

  • HIS101Y1-Y: Histories of Violence
  • ENG140Y1-Y: Literature for our Time
  • PHL100Y1-Y: Introduction to Philosophy
  • CLA170H1-F : Ancient Texts, Modern Worlds  AND CLA160H1-S : Introduction to Classical Studies 

If accepted, you will be automatically enrolled in the two courses (and any accompanying tutorials) you selected along with other students in your FLC who selected the same courses.

During course enrolment, you will have the option to choose additional courses to complete your first-year course schedule. The courses you are pre-enrolled in with your FLC are the core courses that your FLC peers will be enrolled in. However, if you have a conflict between these core courses and any new courses that you will be adding to your schedule, you have the option to change your course section. Visit the New Student Guide for more information about course selection and enrolment.

Course Name Course Code Section Day of Week     Time
Humanities FLC HUM099Y1-Y Lecture 0101/0201 Monday 11:30 a.m. – 1p.m.

Choose two of the following:

Histories of Violence HIS101Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Tuesday, Thursday 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Tutorial 0201/0202 or 0501/0601 Tuesday: 0201/0202
Wednesday: 0501/0601

0201/0202: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.  

0501: 11 a.m. – 12  p.m . 

0601: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.  

Literature for our Time ENG140Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Friday 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Tutorial: 0101/0102/0103/0104 Friday 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Introduction to Philosophy PHL100Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Tuesday, Thursday 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Tutorial 0501/0601 or 0701/0702 Wednesday: 0501/0601
Thursday: 0701/0702

0501: 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.

0601: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

0701/0702: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.  

Ancient Texts, Modern Worlds CLA170H1-F Lecture 0101  Tuesday, Thursday 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Course Name Course Code Section Day of Week     Time
Humanities FLC HUM099Y1-Y Lecture 0101/0201 Monday 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
Choose two of the following:
Histories of Violence HIS101Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Tuesday, Thursday 4 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Tutorial 0201/0202 or 0501/0601  Tuesday: 0201/0202
Wednesday: 0501/0601 

0201/0202: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.  

0501: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.  

0601: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.  

Literature for our Time ENG140Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Friday 2 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Tutorial 0101/0102/0103/0104 Friday 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.
Introduction to Philosophy PHL100Y1-Y Lecture 0101 Tuesday, Thursday 11 am – 12 pm
Tutorial 0501/0601 or 0701/0702 Wednesday: 0501/0601
Thursday: 0701/0702

0501: 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.  

0601: 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. 

0701/0702: 12 p.m. – 1 p.m.

Introduction to Classical Studies CLA160H1-S Lecture 0101 Monday, Wednesday 1 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Tutorial 0201 or 0301

Friday

0201:10 a.m. – 11 a.m.  

0301: 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.  

Your FLC Faculty & Staff Team 

Paul Bessler

Department: French

Title: Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream

Tell us about yourself. I am an assistant professor in the Department of French. My areas of teaching and research are French language French linguistics, particularly morphology and syntax.
 
Why are you interested in being a staff advisor/faculty advisor for FLCs? When I arrived at the University of Toronto as a first-year student, there were few programs in place to help new students familiarize themselves with the university and I remember feeling a bit lost and confused. Having finished my studies, I believe that it is very important to help make the transition from secondary school to university as smooth as possible for new students.
 
What is one piece of advice you want to give to first-year students? Always be inquisitive; never be afraid to ask questions.

Headshot of FLC Faculty Advisor Angie Fazekas

Department: Women & Gender Studies Institute

Title: Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream

About me: I am an assistant professor at the Women & Gender Studies Institute (WGSI), where I teach courses on queer studies and pop culture. I recently received my PhD from WGSI and my dissertation focused on teenagers who read and write fanfiction as a way of figuring out their identities. Before that, I completed my undergraduate degree at U of T in life sciences and anthropology and my Master of Arts at Queen’s University in gender studies. I’ve also spent time working at a fairtrade store and at a women’s shelter.

My research interests include fanfiction, pop culture, queer studies and critical race theory and I’m currently writing an article about monsters in the Jurassic Park franchise. I’ve been teaching for approximately seven years and I was a teaching assistant (TA) for several years before that. Outside of school, I also enjoy reading and writing fanfiction and all things pop culture. Some of my other hobbies include climbing, weightlifting and board games.

Why FLCs? My favourite part about teaching is the opportunity to connect with students. I really enjoyed working as a faculty advisor last year because it gave me the opportunity to get to know students and offer advice and information to help them on their academic journeys. When I was an undergraduate student at U of T, I struggled to find community and figure out my path through academia and I really enjoy being able to help students not have the same struggles I did. I always find I learn a lot from students as well.

Top tip for incoming students: Be open to new opportunities and unexpected directions. Sometimes, university can open the world for you and present you with opportunities you never even thought of. Being open to those and to taking a different path than the one you'd planned might lead you to new, exciting places.

Carrie Reese

Department: Office of the Vice-Provost, Innovations in Undergraduate Education

Title: Teaching Initiatives Coordinator Humanities

Tell us about yourself. I moved to Toronto from the U.S. for my PhD in cinema studies at U of T. Since completing it, I’ve taught and worked in educational development. I’m currently a teaching initiatives coordinator, Office of the Vice-Provost, Innovations in Undergraduate Education. In my free time I enjoy hanging with my dog, watching K-Dramas and playing tennis.

 
Why are you interested in being a staff advisor/faculty advisor for FLCs?
As someone who transferred after my first year of university due to a lack of supports and community, I’m excited to see the ways that peer mentors have been able to create excitement and community amidst the uncertainty of new first-year experiences. This role provides a great opportunity for me to connect with and further support peer mentors and FLCees.
 
What is one piece of advice you want to give to first-year students?
Go to office hours! Forming great working relationships with my professors was one of the best things I did for my undergraduate learning experience. I'm still in touch with many of my first year professors today.

Shirley Chen

Program(s): English specialist, philosophy minor, book and media studies minor

Year: Four 

College: Innis College 

Hometown: Guangzhou, China / Vancouver, British Columbia 

What activities have you been involved in on campus? Trinity Times editor, the Creative Writing Club, EmpowART U of T volunteer coordinator (art therapy), writing for Goose Fiction, UC Review, Trinity Review and other campus journals. 

Why peer mentorship? I was a mentee in my first year and a mentor ever since my second year. It's an amazing community to be in where we learn from each other and together outside of regular school work! 

What are you looking forward to this academic year? I look forward to meeting more wonderful people in my programs and the FLC. 

What advice would you give to first-year students? Join clubs that fit your interests! There, you can have fun and make new friends, while getting a head start towards leadership positions and enriching your resume.

Kaitlyn D'Souza

Program(s): Religion major, philosophy major, political science minor

Year: Three 

College: Trinity College 

Hometown: Toronto, Ontario 

What activities have you been involved in on campus? Trinity Times, Humanities for Humanity, My Networking Club 

Why peer mentorship? In first year, my FLC gave me the opportunity to meet others in my program, learn about helpful resources and experience university outside of the typical academic classroom –  an experience I was very thankful for! In my second year, I was an assistant peer mentor and was so glad that I got to share my resources and knowledge with first-year students. I'm very excited to continue in my role this year and help make your transition to university a lot less intimidating. 

What are you looking forward to this academic year? This year, I'm super excited to work with a new group of students and share everything I've  learned during my first two years. From tips about managing the workload to finding different extracurriculars on campus, I hope that I'll be able to provide students with resources that really helped me during my academic career. Apart from that, I'm really looking forward to getting to know the students and creating content which suits their interests and needs! 

What advice would you give to first-year students? Join extracurriculars that you are interested in and passionate about. Getting to know a group of students with whom you share similar interests can make meeting others in a big school a lot less intimidating! Plus, U of T has so many different clubs, organizations and committees to take advantage of, providing various ways to experience university outside of the classroom.

Krity Ghosh

Program(s): Criminology and socio-legal studies major, philosophy major

Year: Three 

College: Victoria College 

Hometown: Toronto, Ontario 

What activities have you been involved in on campus? From 2023 to 2024, I was an events director for the Victoria College Off-Campus Association (VOCA) where I planned events for commuter students, made pancakes every Tuesday and learned about the challenges of commuter life. I also volunteered once a week at Caffiends, which is a student-run cafe at Victoria College. 

Why peer mentorship? I want to be a peer mentor because I was in the humanities FLC in my first year and it helped me navigate my first year as I adjusted to the new environment. I liked how supportive my peer mentors were and the FLC made it easier to make friends within my lecture sections. FLCs are extremely beneficial in informing students about academic procedures, student supports and extracurriculars. I want to contribute to the student community by helping other students navigate their first year at U of T. 

What are you looking forward to this academic year? I am looking forward to meeting new students, hosting interactive and informative sessions and building a strong sense of community within my FLC. I also can't wait to talk to the students in my FLC about their classes, give course recommendations and offer advice if needed. 

What advice would you give to first-year students? If you are not able to go to your professor's office hours, please reach out to your teaching assistants (TAs) before your assignment is due and get some insight from them. Your TA will most likely grade your assignments so it's better to talk about your ideas with them. Additionally, please participate in your tutorials. Not only are you demonstrating your knowledge of the subject, but you can also get direct clarification from your TA and feel more comfortable about speaking in class.

Marissa Lombardi

Program(s): French language learning major, anthropology minor, education and society minor

Year: Four 

College: St. Michael's College 

Hometown: Port Perry, Ontario 

What activities have you been involved in on campus? Hart House Chamber Strings (viola), AC centre drop-in hours, Study Abroad (tours, France), VicOne Education Stream, VicGlobal South Korea BHA Teaching Internship, VicReach annual volunteer, French Department event planning and attendee for French Course Union. 

Why peer mentorship? As a fourth year student, I hope to connect with the U of T community one last time and to pass along useful tips and advice to navigate your degree and make the most of your experience. Looking back to my first year, I wish I had utilized all the resources offered through my program by joining a FLC.   

What are you looking forward to this academic year? As I work towards  graduation, I am most excited to take SPA100: Spanish for Beginners and further my language development. U of T has many great language courses and have been the some of the most enriching courses of my undergraduate studies. 

What advice would you give to first-year students? Trust yourself and your abilities. Take advantage of all the supports available.