International or Indigenous Course Module Program

The International or Indigenous Course Module Program (ICMs) provides an opportunity for:

  • Students to enhance their classroom learning by applying course content to relevant settings and communities around the globe
  • Faculty members to incorporate an intensive international or Indigenous experiential module into the framework of existing undergraduate courses.

International opportunities include partnerships developed with Indigenous nations both within Canadian borders and beyond. Since the ICMs were first introduced, more than 50 groups of students have traveled to destinations in Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe and the United States. Modules are integrated into the course plan and travel is scheduled to coincide with the November or February Reading Week.

All student participants must be current Arts & Science (St. George) Degree undergraduate students in good standing and be enrolled in an academic program at the time the proposed activity takes place. All participants must also be enrolled in the course in which the ICM is embedded. 

Student Financial Commitment: Chosen students are asked to contribute $200.00 each towards their ICM. These funds can be collected through group fundraising events.

Note: In an effort to provide as many opportunities as possible, priority will be given to students who have not already received funding for a Faculty of Arts & Science international opportunity including 398 REP, ICM, CFHU or DIIIF. Some exceptions may apply.

Contact: For more information about ICMs or if you have questions, please contact Deborah Shaw (deb.shaw@utoronto.ca).

Upcoming ICM Experiences

    Professor: Katherine Patton (katherine.patton@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 10

    Location of ICM: New Mexico

    Travel dates: February 15-22, 2020

    Description of ICM

    The character of social and political relations at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico is strongly contested in North American Archaeology. Some archaeologist argue that Chaco is an example of social complexity in the absence of state-level authority; other contend that conventional thinking is clouded by pre-existing ideas of statehood, and that Chaco was a state. The area was an important regional centre in the Colorado Plateau between AD 1020 and 1125. Ancestral Pueblos had been farming maize in small communities across this desert environment for over 1000 years, but by the 10th century, these dispersed groups were integrated into a larger social and political entity centred at Chaco Canyon. Archaeological evidence shows that powerful elites, who controlled trade with Mexico, began to construct imposing stone structures called Great Houses at this site. These were elite structures, but also drew people together from the broader Plateau to participate in house building, feasting, and ceremonial events.

    This ICM is designed to allow students to study the archaeological remnants of the “Chaco Phenomenon” first hand. I have structured this module around a visit to a selection of Great Houses at Chaco Canyon, but will also include field stops at Bandelier National Monument, Aztec Ruins, Acoma Pueblo, and the Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre. Bandelier National Monument and Aztec Ruins were influenced by the events at Chaco, including its eventual demise. Acoma Pueblo and Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre will allow students to learn from Indigenous teachers about the region and its history from an Indigenous perspective. As a component of Ant 319Y, this module will give students interested in North American Archaeology an opportunity to explore some of the most important places in North American pre-contact history, to consider how archaeologists observe and understand the built environment, and to learn how archaeologists interpret social, economic, and political organization from archaeological remains. A primary component of this field trip will also be to examine how these sites are presented to the public as well as the promises and pitfalls of archaeological tourism. Finally, we will examine why and how Indigenous and archaeologically-constructed histories sometimes differ from each other.

    Academic Outcomes

    This module will allow students to:

    • Participate in small research agenda that ask them to think about important archaeological concepts pertaining to
    • Landscape, Monumentality, and Public Archaeology,
    • Evaluate the complexities that surround archaeological tourism,
    • Evaluate how these archaeological sites are presented to and interpreted for the public,
    • Learn how Indigenous histories can differ from archaeologically-constructed histories and why,
    • Critique the idea that Chaco is an example of social complexity in the absence of state-level society,
    • Understand Mesoamerican influence north of Mexico,
    • Make connections between lessons learned in the field and material covered in the course.

    This ICM is designed around four small research agenda that students will undertake during field stops described above. Three research agenda are structured around the archaeological concepts of Landscape, Monumentality and Public Archaeology; a fourth is designed to have students think about the tension that sometimes exists between Indigenous and Western knowledge systems with respect to the past. These agenda are designed to foster archaeological observation and critical assessment skills. At Chaco, Aztec, and Bandelier students will need to observe aspects of the site carefully, take notes, draw, and consider a series of questions related to research agenda concepts; students must actively engage with the archaeological sites they experience on this field trip, something that transcends classroom learning. At Acoma and Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre students will focus on how Pueblo history from an Indigenous perspective and consider how this can differ from archaeological perspectives.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class

    Participants will be paired with non-participants and will provide daily summaries of their experiences. Upon return to Toronto, participants will give a short in-class presentation to share the results of their research. Non-participants will be given a chance to ask questions after each presentation that will provide a platform for class discussion. The ICM experience then, will enhance all students’ engagement with the material on the American Southwest. At a general level, field trips also encourage students to take ownership of their learning and their work. This contributes to more thoughtful in-class discussion both from participants and non-participants.

    Marking Scheme

    Assigned readings: Students must read 6 assigned articles prior to the trip and provide a brief summary (3-4 pages) of what they have learned about Chaco Canyon and its environs. (5%)

    Presentations: Formal 5-minute presentation to the class upon return to Toronto (5%)

    Short research essays: Students will undertake a short research agenda at Chaco Canyon, Aztec Ruins, Bandelier National Monument, and Acoma Pueblo that are structured around the following questions:

    1. What is the place of the site within the broader natural and cultural landscape?
    2. How do you experience the Monumentality of the site? 
    3. What can you say about the presentation of the site to the public?
    4. How does Indigenous Pueblo history differ from the archaeological-constructed history presented at National Historic Sites?

    Students will produce a 3-4 page response for each site that address one of these questions. Once marked, students may choose which to upload on a blog about the trip (5% each for a total of 20%). In total, the fieldtrip mark will constitute 30% of the final grade.

    Participants will be paired with non-participants, providing them with daily summaries; participants will also present their research findings to the class. The trip will have a blog where we will upload photographs and notes about our experiences. I will link the post with the Archaeology Centre website and Facebook page, as well as the Anthropology Students’ Association webpage.

    Selection Criteria

    Students will be required to fill out an application form where they must include a short paragraph discussing their interest in the region and how they think the experience will enhance their learning. These applications will be evaluated to ensure that students qualify for the excursion, following Faculty of Arts and Science guidelines, and that they have put considerable thought into their applications. If the number of interested students surpasses the spaces available for this trip, we will ask Archaeology Centre representatives to help make the decision based on quality of
    applications and if necessary a brief interview.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    Participants will be paired with non-participants, providing them with daily summaries; participants will also present their research findings to the class. The trip will have a blog where we will upload photographs and notes about our experiences. I will link the post with the Archaeology Centre website and facebook page, as well as the Anthropology Students’ Association webpage.

    Indigenous Consultation

    I have contacted Acoma Pueblo about visiting their community and will arrange a tour with the Indian Pueblo Cultural Centre. I will be visiting New Mexico in April and will have a chance to meet with representatives of both locations about the proposed visit. Dr. Wastasecoot has also offered to speak to the class as a whole on Indigenous and Western knowledge systems.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    February 15 Flights Toronto- Albuquerque
    February 16 Drive to Bloomfield, NM Visit Aztec Ruins and Salmon Ruins in the afternoon
    February 17 Bloomfield Chaco Canyon (including hike to Pueblo Alto)
    February 18 Bloomfield Chaco Canyon in the morning; drive to Albuquerque in the late afternoon (evening in Albuquerque)
    February 19 Bandelier National Monument and Santa Fe Day trip to Bandelier National Monument. Evening in Santa Fe
    February 20 Santa Fe Historic Santa Fe including Cathedral and Loretto Chapel; late afternoon drive to Albuquerque
    February 21 Albuquerque Morning: Pueblo Indian Cultural Centre; free afternoon
    February 22 Flights Albuquerque-Toronto

     

    Professor: Matthew Light (matthew.light@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 10

    Location of ICM: Mexico City

    Travel dates: February break, 2020

    Description of ICM

    The 2019-20 ICM will be broadly similar to the 2017 trip, focusing on organized crime and corruption in Mexico. However, we will make the ICM more participatory and engaging by expanding students’ interactions with their Mexican peers.

    I developed CRI 427 as the first CRIMSL undergraduate class on organized crime and corruption, covering a range of theoretical problems, including how organized crime groups develop; how they interact with state institutions; and how to combat them while respecting the rule of law and civil rights. Contemporary Mexico illustrates all these questions. In recent years, the Mexican government has been fighting a “criminal insurgency” of drug-trafficking “cartels” that have overrun some parts of the country and corrupted public officials. In response, the Mexican armed forces have conducted a highly militarized anti-mafia campaign aided by the United States. This “narco-insurgency” is the most extreme mafia-related conflict in the world today.

    To explore these issues, in 2017, I led ten students from CRI 427 on the first CRIMSL ICM to Mexico, in which, students studied the Mexican narco-insurgency, and possible solutions to it, in the safe environment of Mexico City. The ICM was developed with Professor Monica Serrano of the Colegio de Mexico (“Colmex”), one of the leading experts on Mexico’s security problems; and assisted by a doctoral student, Valentin Pereda, originally from Mexico City. The ICM featured unique activities, including presentations by Professor Serrano and other leading scholars, and meetings with Mexican officials and civil society activists, and Canadian diplomats. We also went on an orientation walk around downtown Mexico City and visited the Anthropological Museum and Teotihuacan pyramids, major preColombian monuments.

    In addition, a group of Professor Serrano’s Colmex students (selected for English proficiency) attended several ICM activities. Meeting their Mexican peers turned out to be the highlight of the trip for our students, and the Toronto and Colmex students developed a friendly relationship, which has continued since the ICM. Professor Serrano and I were delighted by this outcome. She and I will continue our collaboration in the 2019-21 ICM, now joined by her Canadian colleague, Professor Jean Francois Prud’homme, head of the Department of International Studies at Colmex. We all agree that the studentto-student component should be strengthened in future ICMs. As a corollary, the lecture component will be reduced. This change is desirable in itself, as we felt there was too much passive listening in the 2017 ICM. In the 2019-21 ICMs, two days formerly allocated to lectures will be dedicated to cooperative small-group projects, in which a few Mexican and Canadian students will meet on their own to discuss issues of corruption and informality in Mexican and Canadian society, and will then prepare a small report for the group. The projects will involve observations around Mexico City, allowing the Toronto students to experience the metropolis beyond tourist sights and offices. This change will make the ICM more experiential. (I address safety issues below.) To enhance the cultural dimension of the ICM, and ensure the group maintains cohesion during the break-out days, I will add a concert or other cultural event on Day 5 or 6.

    Academic Outcomes

    • Students will gain a holistic perspective on Mexico’s cartel violence, understanding it not just as a security problem, but also a political, economic, and social one.
    • By examining the relations between the state and mafias, students will acquire a more developed understanding of formal and informal authority in modern societies.
    • Students will learn what factors influence the success or failure of official anti-mafia policies, and in particular the difficulties of conducting anti-mafia policy in a human rights-respecting manner.
    • Through examination of the military campaign against the cartels, students will also consider the role of international partners (in this case the US and Canada) in combatting crime in developing societies, an issue that is receiving increasing attention among academic criminologists.
    • Through the cultural activities (excursions to the museum and pyramids and the orientation walk, and perhaps also a concert) the ICM also introduces students to Mexico’s rich Spanish and aboriginal cultural inheritance.
    • The mini-projects with Mexican students will enable Toronto students to learn about the interests and concerns of their Mexican counterparts at first hand, and will thus add a deeper and more personal component to the ICM.

    Marking Scheme

    Students in CRI 427 write two substantial (eight- to ten-page) analytical papers based on course readings. ICM and non-ICM students will receive the same set of broad topics for the first such assignment. For the second paper, ICM participants will receive a separate set of topics, addressing Mexico’s narco-insurgency. ICM students’ papers will draw on both the course readings and their experiences during the ICM.

    Participants will also attend all ICM events and take careful notes, which they will submit for verification of participation.

    I will recruit volunteers to take photographs for the dissemination materials discussed below. As noted in above, ICM students and Mexican peers will present a report on their research projects to the whole ICM group on the last or next-to-last day of the ICM. Returned ICM students will also give a presentation to the class as a whole following their return from Mexico City, and this presentation will be factored into their course participation marks. As in 2017, we will assign a separate course number to the ICM group, facilitating communication with ICM participants.

    Selection Criteria

    In September, I will solicit applications from the 25 students expected in the course. Applicants will complete a survey explaining their interest in the ICM, previous ICM or other foreign travel experiences (with preference for students who have not had such opportunities in the past), and their GPA (supported by a transcript). I will then select the final group in consultation with the Toronto/Mexico student coordinator based on these criteria, with priority for fourth-year students and consideration to gender balance among participants. This procedure worked well in 2017, and we do not plan major changes.

    Participation by non-ICM students

    The course will include a unit on “mafia insurgencies,” with readings on the Mexican case, to be completed before the ICM. Non-ICM students will complete the required readings and attend the related lecture. They will contribute to the ICM through the class discussion, which will help focus participants’ ideas and questions as they prepare for their trip to Mexico.

    How the ICM enhances classroom learning for students

    ICM participants explore the themes of the course in depth, while engaging with the political and social problems of a neighbouring society that is closely connected to Canada. In addition, the ICM will allow students to grasp more fully the social and political embeddedness of crime, and its relation to systemic problems of economic and political development, in keeping with the multidisciplinary social science nature of our undergraduate criminology program. Non-ICM participants will hear a class presentation from the ICM group (see below), which will add to their understanding of the Mexico-related readings that they have also completed. We also hope to record at least some ICM events and make them available to non-ICM students. In addition, non-ICM students can also participate in the dissemination activities outlined below.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    Based on notes and photographs from Mexico City, returned ICM participants will write an article on the ICM for the Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies website and newsletter, and the Woodsworth College Program Office website. The Program Office will also send this article to all undergraduate criminology students and post it to the criminology program’s Facebook page, as well as to the “U of T news for students” and “U of T news” websites. ICM students will also present a poster at the FAS research forum. In addition, the Program Office will organize a lunch-hour “Let’s talk” session in which returned ICM participants share their experiences with any interested students, to inform them about the ICM program. I may ask undergraduate criminology students association CRIMSA and FAS staff to help organize this event. Our 2017 ICM was also covered on the U of T website.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    Day 1 Toronto, Mexico City (MC) Flight to MC, check in to hotel
    Day 2 MC Welcome and introductory lecture by Professor Serrano, meeting with Mexican students; orientation walk
    Days 3 and 4 MC Substantive full-group activities (meetings with Mexican and Canadian officials, NGOs)
    Days 5 and 6 MC Small-group research projects with Mexican and Canadian students; see Question 1 for details. Also, concert one evening.
    Days 7 and 8 MC and environs Cultural activities (pyramids and
    Anthropological Museum; see Question 1 for details); student presentations of small-group projects
    Day 9 MC Flight to Toronto

     

    Preliminary Plans for Meeting Safety Abroad Guidelines

    In addition to the university’s required security seminar, I will also conduct specialized preparation for safety issues in this ICM based on my experiences with security issues in the city. Please note that I have recently (2014 and 2017) been to Mexico City myself, and found it relatively safe for international visitors. There has been almost no organized crime-related violence in the city, and street crime in areas frequented by foreign visitors is at acceptable levels. (Global Affairs Canada considers Mexico City comparable in safety to many other sites in developing countries also visited by ICM groups.) In addition, I have designed the ICM itself with security in mind. Thus, my plan calls for group rather than individual activities; see itinerary below. Students will travel to and from these activities together.

    Moreover, both the student coordinator and I will also stay in the same hotel as the ICM group. We will also attend all group activities, as well as the excursions to the Anthropological Museum, the pyramids, and the concert. I have an intermediate proficiency in Spanish, and so can communicate on behalf of the students in emergencies. I will also give students my cell phone number and ask for their numbers as well.

    We experienced no safety issues in the 2017 ICM, and I see no reason for concern in 2019-21 ICMs. Although, as noted above, our students will be breaking up into small groups with Mexican students for the mini-projects on Days 5 and 6, Mexican students will accompany them, and they will be in telephone contact with me. In consultation with Professors Serrano and Prud’homme, I will approve all small-group projects in advance for safety.

    Professor: Xu Chu (xu.chu@utoronto.ca) and Daniel Gregory (daniel.gregory@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 12

    Location of ICM: South Africa

    Travel dates: February 14-23, 2020

    Description of ICM

    The proposed course module covers themes that span from early Earth to Anthropocene. The Kaapvaal craton in South Africa is one of the only two pristine Archean continents that remained largely intact over the past three billion years and hosts the most spectacular and fascinating geologic phenomena on planet Earth. This ICM trip will visit type localities like the kimberlite pipe at Kimberley, komatiite outcrops along the Komati River, and the Archean Barberton greenstone belt; all are classic field areas discussed in every petrology textbook. The trip also includes Transvaal Supergroup the first stable sedimentary sequence on a continent, the rock records of Paleoproterozoic (2.0 Ga) supercontinent and glaciation, and the massive meteorite impact at Vredefort Dome.

    South Africa’s history and economy are built upon its natural resources, and the trip will visit the sites and mines of great geologic and economic significance. The Bushveld Igneous Complex and the Witwatersrand Basin contain some of the world’s richest ore deposits, which are the largest reserves (>50%) of platinum group elements and gold, respectively. Extensive debate still exists on the sources and mineralization processes, which we will explore at site visits. The Kalahari Manganese Field is a unique land-based massive sedimentary manganese deposit. The VMS-type gold deposit in the Barberton Greenstone Belt and placer diamond deposits of the Vaal Basin will also be discussed.

    The Wits gold mines and Kimberley diamond mine provide an excellent opportunity to explore the country’s conflicts and its history of exploitation inherent in colonialism and industrialization. We will also discuss why South Africa’s wealth of natural resources failed to improve Africans’ welfare, but instead had provided legitimacy for racial exclusivism, segregation, and social injustice. The magnificent history of humankind echoes that of Earth in southern Africa, where homo sapiens evolved and migrated. In addition to geologic sites, we are going to visit the Wonderwrek Cave that preserves the evidence of oldest controlled fire as well as a series of ritual spaces. Rock paintings dating back to the paleolithic era scatter on many outcrops, adding to the geologic wonder and beauty.

    Academic Outcomes

    Both courses are broadly categorized in a theme of Earth Materials in our undergraduate curriculum. ESS 222 Petrology introduces three major types of rocks and provides a systematic training scheme for the students to learn petrologic observation, description, identification, and interpretation. ESS423 Mineral Deposits focuses on the mineralogy and petrology of ore deposits and builds a basic scientific framework for understanding the origin and distribution of mineral deposits on planet Earth.

    The ICM trip to South Africa offers a wide variety of hands-on experience for the students to understand the geologic context and significance of important lithologic units, and more importantly, fosters students’ curiosity in natural rocks and makes them aware of the skills necessary in their careers as geologists. The sites include some of the most important ore deposits in the world. Examining these at the deposit scale allows a much more comprehensive understanding of how they formed and how to recognize a similar deposit than in a classroom setting which can only provide a few hand samples from the deposit. This makes the opportunity to visit these deposits invaluable to any aspiring economic geologist.

    The Archean-Paleoproterozoic geology of Ontario shares many similarities with the Kaapvaal Craton, including TTG-greenstone terranes, Paleoproterozoic oxidation and glaciation, and contemporaneous massive meteorite impacts (Sudbury and Vredefort). Most 2nd-year students in our program participate in the mapping camp at Whitefish Falls (ESS 234) where they discuss these topics in the field. The African trip will reveal these global geologic events, build the links in a comprehensive framework, and help the students to think further about the geological evolution of habitability in Earth’s past.

    This module will allow students to:

    • Describe petrographic features of rock and ore deposit types observed during the trip.
    • Learn and practice basic field techniques.
    • Relate the petrogenesis and mineralization processes learned in the course to field geology.
    • Summarize the Archean-Paleoproterozoic history of Kaapvaal Craton and compare with the geologic evolution of Canadian Shield.
    • Appreciate indigenous cultures and arts and gain exposures to the evolution of humankind.

    We expect the senior students (ESS423) to gain a deeper understanding of the material by explaining field skills and the geologic framework to 2nd-year students (ESS222). The ICM group will collect samples and, through group work, transfer their knowledge and field notes to their classmates in group projects, so all students will be involved in the course module. We also engage non-participants in the preparatory readings for their research groups to crystallize a project topic before participants take the trip.

    Marking Scheme

    The students will complete two individual assignments in the field (i.e., outcrop sketches). The field assignments (5%) and group presentation (5%, see below), will constitute 10% of the final grade. Students unable to join the field trip will participate in group projects with those from the trip.

    The group projects will focus on microscopic observations and necessary instrumental analyses (e.g., EPMA, SEM, XRF, XRD) on rock or ore samples collected from the trip.

    Sample preparation and observation (ESS222, 5%) or data acquisition and analysis (ESS423, 5%), and final presentation will constitute 10% of the grades of the other students.

    The groups will give poster presentations about the petrogenesis and geologic information recorded by the rocks, in a colloquium at the end of the semester.

    Selection Criteria

    According to our previous experience, we do not anticipate all enrolled students to desire to join. Many students would plan to use the reading week to prepare for midterms, and senior students from ESS 423 might have to attend job fair events in mid-February. It is still likely that an excessive number of students will express interest in the trip. Previous ICM instructors in our department consulted our undergraduate student association; the students who are not enrolled in the course will briefly interview with the eligible students. The instructors will rank the students on the basis of the panel recommendation (50%) and the final marks or prerequisite courses (50%; ESS222—Mineralogy; ESS423—Petrology, Introduction to Geological Field Methods, and Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology). The spaces allocated to two courses could be flexible based on the numbers of interested students.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    The students will present their findings in a poster session in a Friday Rockfest colloquium. Rockfest is a weekly semi-formal seminar series organized by our graduate students (AGESS) and has been highly successful. Rockfest also engages faculty and students from other departments (e.g., EEB, Physics). The students have been enthusiastic about sharing their real-time experiences in our past international field trips. We will create a trip blog on our department website and update daily if possible.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    February 14 Flight YYZ-AMS-JNB Depart Toronto (6:05 PM)
    February 15 Flight YYZ-AMS-JNB Arrive in Johannesburg
    February 16 Johannesburg Komati River
    • Jet lag recovery (morning) and groceries
    • Drive to Komati River (3hr40min; Songimvelo Kromdraai Camp Site)
    February 17 Komati River Barberton
    • Komati River hike
    • Barberton greenstone belt and TTG
    • Transvaal Supergroup
    February 18 Barberton-Bushveld Johannesburg
    • Bushveld Igneous Complex (Dwars River Heritage Site)
    • Drive to Johannesburg
    February 19 Johannesburg-
    Vredefort
    • Witwatersrand Gold Mine
    • Walter Sisulu Botanical Garden (Rand Group goldbearing quartz conglomerate)
    • Drive to Vredefort
    February 20 Vredefort-Kimberley
    • Vredefort Crater
    • Drive to Kimberley
    • The Big Hole & Kimberley Mine Museum
    February 21 Kimberley-DouglasKuruman
    • Ongeluk lava; Makganyene diamictite; Dwyka glacial pavement
    • Wonderwerk Cave paleoanthropological site
    • Kalahari Manganese Field
    • The Workshop Ko Ksai
    February 22 Kuruman-Johannesburg
    • Drive to Johannesburg (5hr36min)
    • Origin Center at Univ. Wits (optional)
    • Depart Johannesburg Airport in the evening (8:55 PM; flight JNB-ATL-YYZ)
    February 23 Toronto Arrive in Toronto in the morning

    Professor: Grant Henderson (henders@es.utoronto.ca) and Russell Pysklywec (r.pysklywec@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 12

    Location of ICM: Central Turkey (Cappadocia, Nevsehir, Goreme—A UNESCO Geological World Heritage Site), Istanbul

    Travel dates: Fall break, 2019

    Description of ICM

    Anatolia has a fascinating geologic history of active and past tectonics. It is situated at the ancient Tethyan plate boundary that finished closure with the collision of the Himalayan system further to the east. Subsequently the entire Anatolian block seems to have been extruded westwards away from the Arabian plate collision: essentially the microplate is being stretched E-W. The field sites to be visited around Cappadocia in Central Anatolia are the geological locus for this extension. As such, the areas will encompass exploration of complex regions of major volcanism, seismicity,
    tectonic structure, and geothermal activity and this remarkable geologic diversity makes it an ideal location to study minerals, rocks, and tectonics. The ICM trip will allow students to observe a wide range of geologic features and discuss active geologic processes, with direct observation at specific field locations.

    At the same time, the geological intrigue of Anatolia is reflected in the cultural and historical complexity of Turkey. As the meeting place of continents and civilizations, the area represents one of the unique regions of the world to understand human socio-economic development, conflict, and interaction from antiquity to the present day. The past and present-day human life in the region has been impacted by the regional geology and tectonics. For example, underground cities of up to 10,000 people were carved into the soft volcanic tuffs and inhabited at stages from Hittite
    to early Christian times. Hydrothermal mineralization in the region has supported mining activity since Assyrian times. These and other field sites will be visited during the module to illustrate how anthropogenic factors are influenced by the geologic activity of Anatolia.

    **This is Part II to the ICM trip to Western Turkey in Fall 2018. The students will see/learn a complementary set of active tectonics from the field trip. Pedagogically, it’s designed to have these subsequent trips (as recommended by the ICM office) to have a cohort of students learn common concepts for ongoing discussion in ongoing program study.

    Academic Outcomes

    By the end of this module students will be able to:

    • Describe active and recent geologic features in Central Anatolia and place them into a geologic context
    • Summarize the geology/tectonics of the Eastern Mediterranean region generally -understand how these geologic processes give rise to the development and distribution of the relevant minerals and rocks in the region
    • Appreciate the rise/decline of various civilizations at this important cultural crossroads and understand how geological processes have affected humans (past and present-day); for example, living with and making use of active volcanism
    • Evaluate information learned in the ESS221 course to an actual field setting - relate information covered in other courses (Earth systems, physics, chemistry, history, religion, political science) to field observations
    • Interaction with Turkish geoscience students and discovery of how students in their area of study learn in a different environment and style of instruction/learning
    • Explain their thoughts when confronted with new and complex observations - work with others in a field setting

    Marking Scheme

    There will be graded student activities during the fieldtrip (notebooks, mapping exercises, presentations), as well as a summary report after the fieldtrip. The fieldtrip mark will constitute 10% of the final grade.

    Selection Criteria

    If the number of interested students surpasses available spaces, we suggest a panel of students from our undergraduate student association and who are not enrolled in the course will make a decision based on brief interviews with the students.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    As with past years, the students will create posters about what they learned on the trip to share with the other students in the class, to put up in the department, and to present at the FAS Research Forum. These posters will be part of the grade for the module. In addition, students on the ICM ES trips have been eager to share their real-time experiences with the University and public through social media (Instagram, blogs, Facebook, etc.) and we will continue this online dissemination of the geologic journey on this proposed trip.

    In addition, the trip leaders will actively promote the trip as an ES student recruitment and cohort-building opportunity. E.g., the 2018 trip has built a strong cadre of community-minded students who are sharing their experiences. This is a very important “intangible” outcome of the ICM and will be continued here.

    Indigenous Consultation

    There may be an opportunity for engaging with indigenous groups in Central Anatolia, but in Turkey it can be a bit difficult (sometimes contentious) to identify true indigenous groups. E.g., those descending from the original Turkic tribes who initially settled Central Anatolia, vs. mixed groups of Caucasians, Kurds, Roma, etc. We will explore this in some more detail with our contacts at the host institutions in Turkey and develop it.

    The combination of exotic geology and culture in Turkey, as well as deep interaction with Turkish students made for an ideal ICM experience. This can be measured by the abundant student feedback. In addition, the Turkish hosts (Istanbul Technical University, Cannakale University, Efemcukuru Gold Mine) were exceptionally positive and promote a return student visit.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    November 1 Flight Depart Toronto
    November 2-3 Istanbul Visit to Istanbul Technical University (ITU), Eurasian Earth Sciences Institute; intro to Anatolia geology; student exchange
    November 4 Flight to Nevsehir Travel. Introduction to Goreme and geology (volcanic tuffs, ignimbrites, etc.)
    November 5 Goreme Fairy chimneys hike: Goreme to Uchisar; volcanic features, hydrothermals
    November 6 Mount Erciyes Stratovolcano (active); hike and climb
    November 7-8 Ihlara Valley, Derinkuyu Derinkuyu underground city, mineralization and mining
    November 9 Flight to Istanbul Return visit to ITU; presentation/discussion of field experiences
    November 10 Istanbul-Toronto Return

    Professor: Franco Taverna (franco.taverna@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 8

    Location of ICM: The Netherlands

    Travel dates: February 15-21, 2020

    Description of ICM

    Innovations in Elderly Care

    HMB440H1: Dementia explores in depth the multi-disciplinary aspects of dementia with special attention paid to the clinical, genetic, molecular, and social aspects of dementia, with an overview focus on Alzheimer's disease. An embedded community-engaged learning opportunity allows upper-year life science students to become friendly visitors at a local long-term care facility to provide friendship and support to a matched resident. The visits and one-to-one interaction ground the academic learning goals, particularly the clinical and social aspects of dementia, by allowing students to explore what living with dementia is like and the challenges with providing care to the elderly, while also gaining further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline, and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. Caring for the aged, especially those with dementia, is an increasingly critical global health issue as people live longer and the elderly population increases, sometimes surpassing the younger population. The province of Ontario is currently facing a shortage of long-term care beds and facility staff, resulting in inconsistent good care; at least half of existing long-term care facilities need to be rebuilt or modernized to meet the 2016 guidelines listed by the Ontario Long Term Care Association. In March 2018, the Government of Ontario announced an investment plan that will help increase the number of beds available in the province in the next 10 years, and has invested $101 million over the next three years for Ontario’s dementia strategy, which includes enhancing and increasing access to programs, education, as well as training and respite service for care partners. This provides an ideal opportunity to integrate design features that would improve quality of life for the residents and lessen the burden of dementia.

    This would be the 2nd year of this ICM. In our first visit, 8 of our students experienced an intensive learning curriculum at three internationally recognized elderly care facilities in the Netherlands. Each has innovated in different ways to sustainably improve the quality of life for the elderly (see attached report). We now have 8 trained future leaders who can bring that knowledge the knowledge and practices back to Ontario.

    Quite interestingly, all three of the care facilities had at least one common theme – to bring a more normal and meaningful life to the elderly in their care. This is not unlike the “emotion centred” care philosophy modelled after the U.K. developed “Butterfly” model that has been recently piloted in Peel Region. There is clearly an appetite to change for the better. The question remains - what is the evidence of effectiveness of these distinct methods on the them of a meaningful life? Unfortunately – research on effectiveness is lacking (as discussed with our partners in the Netherlands on our trip).

    Therefore – we are applying to return to the Netherlands next year to, in partnership with our 3 facility leaders and innovators, develop the research methodology necessary to build evidence for effectiveness of the 3 distinct models of care. It is quite challenging to do research toward effectiveness in a quality of life setting, and we feel this learning outcome will be invaluable for our students as they progress to careers in this field in the current environment in Ontario.

    Academic Outcomes

    The ICM will offer practical opportunities to observe and learn about internationally recognized elderly care models in the Netherlands. These models of care are meant to meet the increasing challenges of an aging population and to promote living with dignity. Students will: learn new innovative methods and facility models for long-term care of the elderly; compare and contrast care models in Ontario to those internationally; identify challenges, engage in design thinking, and think critically about sustainability of healthcare, in particular how it relates to aging and dementia; learn how to network and make valuable professional and academic contacts for future academic work; learn about the social determinants of health and quality of life in the context of aging and dementia.

    And – as a progression from last year, students will develop the research knowledge necessary to test effectiveness and apply that knowledge on site through development workshops with our partners in the Netherlands.

    Marking Scheme

    The students will work in groups of up to five (5) with at least one member participating in the ICM. The groups will work together as a class to do research and learn about the models of care offered in the Netherlands. There will be an in-class critical review of the current state of care and long-term care facilities in Ontario to introduce the students to the complex issues and challenges faced by society and those living with dementia. The groups will also work together to complete a key course assignment (described below) that includes a research proposal to test the innovations with respect to relevant variables and outcomes related to elderly care and quality of life.

    Assignment and Description Weight
    Placement Project Draft* 0-3%
    Placement Project – Life History 17-20%
    Participation 5%
    Professionalism 5%
    Group Project Draft 0-3%
    Group Presentation – Innovations in Dementia Care 10%
    Group Project – Innovations in Dementia Care 17-20%
    Midterm Exam 15%
    Final Exam 25%

    Selection Criteria

    Only students enrolled in the course may participate. If participation by less than the total number of students in the course is proposed, the following procedures and criteria will be used to select ICM participants.

    Interested students will apply for the ICM with a current CV, a copy of their latest transcript and a onepage letter of interest. A panel of key Human Biology Program partners will interview finalist students. Students will be chosen based on their interview, letter of interest balanced with cGPA, prior travel, work, and volunteer experience.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    Students present their work at our course symposium style presentation at the end of the semester. Local stakeholders including long-term care facility representatives, Alzheimer’s Society of Toronto representatives and our course expert guest lecturers, Dr. Kathy McGilton, a senior scientist at the Toronto Rehabilitation Institution, and Dr. Veronique Boscart, CIHR/Schlegel Industrial Research Chair for Colleges in Seniors Care will be invited.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    February 15 Toronto Depart for Amsterdam
    February 17 Arnhem Old School workshop at Vreedenhoff
    February 18 Deventer Humanitas – humanising care model workshop
    February 19 Weesp De Hogeweyk – Dementia Village workshop
    February 20 Amsterdam Local museum tour (Dementia tour)
    February 21 Amsterdam Depart for Toronto

    Professor: Robert Austin (robert.austin@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 9

    Location of ICM: Tbilisi and Signagi, Georgia

    Travel dates: February 14-23, 2020

    Description of ICM

    Georgia: Democratization and Integration Amidst Conflict

    POL 359Y1 examines the consequences and potential of enlargement and deeper integration for the European Union (EU). The course emphasizes the impact that integration, and the prospect of integration, has on the potential member states and the countries bordering the EU. One of the most significant aspects of the EU’s foreign relations is the European Neighborhood Policy (ENP) and the Eastern Partnership (EaP). Through these initiatives the EU seeks to promote stability and prosperity within neighboring states in accordance with its fundamental values of human rights, democracy and the rule of law. The 2014 crisis in Ukraine and the EU’s newly articulated commitment to offering Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia enhanced partnerships, Georgia’s role in the transit of natural gas and oil, as well as its ongoing territorial conflicts with Russia ensure Georgia’s enhanced importance for the EU and NATO. Where does Georgia go now? Can it join the Baltic States and become one of the very few post-Soviet success stories?

    Academic Outcomes

    The 2020 trip, which is our 6th one to Georgia after more than 10 years of ICMs in Kosovo, would give students a chance to examine the changes that have taken place since Georgia’s elections in 2012 and 2016. Students will have the opportunity to assess the implications of this democratic transition (a requirement for normalizing relations with the EU, in the post-Soviet space) for Georgia’s continued integration into the ENP/EaP, and eventually even the EU. In essence, given Georgia’s tough neighborhood, what are its prospects for Euro-Atlantic integration? In a post-Cold War world it has been faced with choices of regional integration between NATO and the Russian sphere of influence. The region is also significant in the because of the tensions with the breakaway regions of Abkhazia and South Ossetia (which claim independence from the Georgian state) and Georgia’s relations with Russia following the war in August 2008, and the shifting security context following the Russian annexation of the Crimea in February 2014. This trip would allow students to engage with such issues as self-determination, transitional justice, integration, and democratization, which are consistent themes throughout the course. Students tend to perceive these concepts through the lens of their own experiences of political regimes such as the parliamentary democracies and presidencies. However, by allowing students to study the applicable concepts in countries which have different political traditions and legacies, they gain a new lens by which to understand and synthesize information. Individual and group interviews offer many of the students their first chance at real fieldwork, and being able to integrate those interviews into their secondary research is a major outcome.

    Marking Scheme

    All students must submit a major research paper worth 40% of their final grade. Those who travel to Georgia will be expected to integrate their field research into the framework of the major research paper by combining interviews with secondary sources.

    Students will conduct field research and interviews to obtain current primary sources. They must prepare for the interviews by researching their interviewees and composing insightful questions. Students will then have to select which pieces of information to include in their work, and interpret the knowledge that they have gained from all their sources. While students engage in this process, they will have meetings with the instructor to update me on their progress.

    Selection Criteria

    Only students enrolled in the course may participate. If participation by less than the total number of students in the course is proposed, the following procedures and criteria will be used to select ICM participants.

    Interested students will be asked to submit a CV and proposal due at the end of October that outlines a project requiring on-the-ground research into some aspect of the EU’s role in Georgia. Those students who are deemed to be qualified will be invited for face-to-face interviews with a committee set up by the faculty at CERES. Special consideration will be given to students who have not gained significant international experience, and the selection will be gender-balanced.

    Non-ICM participants will contribute to the ICM through the discussions held during the regularly scheduled class lecture and readings on Georgia. Following the lecture, students will have the opportunity to engage with the major themes of the course as they apply to the Georgian case. In doing so, students will help to actively identify tensions and compelling questions in the transition process. This discussion will help to inform the types of projects the ICM will pursue on the ground.

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class and Arts & Science Community

    As part of their follow-up activities, students participating in the ICM will be asked to hold a public roundtable to share and discuss the unique experience made possible by ICM funds, as well as to write articles for university newspapers, and to participate in campus radio programs. In the past, the Kosovo and Georgia ICM alumni have been the most visible parts of the Arts and Science awareness agenda. The 2016 ICM team is turning their research papers into a book. While in the region, students will be providing the University of Toronto with international exposure as they speak to various stakeholders, such as officials from international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and the government, as well as when they interact with local students.

    The success of the Georgia ICM module is already well established at the U of T based on student feedback. Future success will be measured though a combination of course instructor feedback on the level of integration into the final paper of primary resources obtained during the excursion, as well as through student feedback and debrief sessions. By understanding how students perceived their own skill levels before and after the ICM, the program can be tailored to better connect student experiences and skill development to the overall learning objectives of the course.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    February 14 Flight Depart Toronto
    February 16 Tbilisi Arrive Tbilisi
    February 17-21 Tbilisi Interviews
    February 22 Signagi Wine Region Field Research
    February 23 Flight Arrive Toronto

     

    Professor: Helen Dimaras (helen.dimaras@utoronto.ca) and Maria Papaconstantinou (m.papaconstantinou@utoronto.ca)

    Maximum number of students in the ICM: 10

    Location of ICM: Athens, Greece 

    Travel dates: February 15-22, 2020

    Description of ICM

    The ICM will offer practical opportunity to observe major health concerns in Greece, currently magnified by the double burden of the economic crisis and ongoing influx of migrants fleeing war in the Middle East. For example, the economic crisis has left many Greeks unemployed, resulting in a spike in mental health issues and an increase in suicides. Due to political instability elsewhere, migrants arrive in Athens as a gateway to Europe, often in need of food, shelter, and medical assistance. Public hospitals struggle to meet the needs of locals and migrants alike, amidst healthcare cuts that have left even the most basic of services difficult to provide.

    The students will be introduced to local efforts aiming to meet the health challenges, mainly through a historical tour of grassroots social movements, meetings with advocacy organizations, government officials, academics and health-focused NGOs. The students will explore the sociopolitical context of global health in Greece and align the goals of the ICM to course-specific objectives. Embedded cultural visits will allow for critical reflection and group discussion. Language is not expected to be a problem, as most local partners speak English, and where they do not, both applicants are fluent in Greek and will be able to translate for the students.

    The module aims to reinforce through practical experience the main learning outcomes of the course HMB323H1S (taught by Dr. Dimaras). Specifically, the students will learn to: analyze and think critically about global health theory, practice and research; identify scientific, ethical, social and political challenges and opportunities in global health; explore the role of research, design and innovation to solving complex global health challenges; foster impactful cross-cultural health collaborations and partnerships.

    Academic Outcomes

    This module will allow students to:

    • Develop research skills to conduct relevant global health research
    • To foster impactful cross-cultural research collaborations
    • To Identify Scientific, ethical and political challenges and opportunities for global health research
    • Students will gain a better understanding of the main challenges of each organization and health of the population as a whole.
    • Students will build field research skills and apply their knowledge to develop a grant proposal for a priority health area
    • Students will interact with partner organizations through 
      • Pre-arranged group meetings 
      • Self-directed independent informational interviews

    Sharing ICM Experience with the Class

    During the ICM, the students will utilize social media to share their activities and experiences with others. Upon returning to Toronto, the students will share their experiences with the HMB323H1S class via a short presentation and discussion period. The students will also be required to present a poster at the Undergraduate Research Forum. In addition to the above requirements, students in past ICMs to Greece have also: produced a YouTube video (https://youtu.be/ruSmaq9qqqc); submitted abstracts to relevant conferences; drafted an article for submission to a peer-reviewed publication.

    Marking Scheme

    All students in HMB323H1S are required to design a novel research proposal for 35% of their final grade, the subject matter depending on participation in the ICM. Students who participate in the ICM will be required to submit a proposal that incorporates their research and experience in Athens.

    Itinerary

    Dates

    Location

    Activity

    February 15 Flight Depart Toronto (evening) 
    February 16 Athens, Greece 
    • Arrive Athens (late afternoon)
    • Subway transport to central Athens
    • Orientation and group dinner
    February 17 Athens, Greece Morning
    • Alternative Tours of Athens: Grassroots Social Movements
    • Visit: Greek Forum of Refugees

    Afternoon

    • Group visit to partner organization 
    February 18 Athens, Greece

    Proposal Development Sessions

    • Independent informational interviews
    February 19 Athens, Greece Morning
    • Independent informational interviews

    Afternoon

    • Group visit to partner organization
    February 20 Athens, Greece

    Final Proposal Developed 

    • Independent informational interviews
    • Group visit to partner organization
    February 21 Athens, Greece

    Morning

    • Cultural Visit: Acropolis of Athens & Museum

    Afternoon

    • Final debrief and wrap-up 
    February 22 Flight Depart Athens

    Past ICM Experiences: