2019 Minds Redefined Mental Health & Wellness Conference

Minds Redefined Conference at U of T

 

The Faculty of Arts & Science invites students, faculty, staff and alumni to this inaugural conference on mental health and wellness. As a community, we will hear from experts and advocates in the field, develop wellness strategies, explore campus and community resources, and engage in discussions that showcase research, lived experiences and diverse voices.

 

Arts & Science is a community of scholars dedicated to fostering excellence in the pursuit of knowledge. At the conference we will explore and expand our shared thinking around what it means to excel. In a highly driven, competitive environment, too often individuals feel they cannot ask for help and need to prioritize success over well-being. Through dialogue, listening, and learning, we are committed to broadening our collective understanding and definition of excellence to one that includes individual and community well-being in the pursuit of academic and research success.

 

Join Us

2019 Minds Redefined

Tuesday, September 17, 2019
12 to 8 pm

U of T Chestnut Conference Centre
89 Chestnut Street, Toronto (map)
Shuttle service available from Sidney Smith Hall
Free to the U of T Community

PDF iconConference Schedule

 

Online registration for the 2019 Minds Redefined Conference is now closed.  
Members of the U of T community who still wish to attend may register in person at the conference.  If you have any questions, please email Chad Jankowski at c.jankowski@utoronto.ca

 

Keynote Speakers

 

Margaret Trudeau - Keynote Speaker

Closing Keynote: Margaret Trudeau
Celebrated Canadian / Mental Health Advocate

Margaret Trudeau is a Canadian icon, celebrated both for her role in the public eye and as a respected mental-health issues advocate. From becoming a Prime Minister’s wife at a young age, to the loss of both her son and her former husband, to living with bipolar disorder, she tirelessly shares her personal stories to remind others of the importance of nurturing the body, mind and spirit.

Michael Landsberg - Keynote Speaker

Opening Keynote: Michael Landsberg
Mental Health Advocate / Founder of #SickNotWeak

One of the best-known personalities in Canadian broadcasting, Michael Landsberg is an ambassador for Bell Let’s Talk – an initiative focused on raising awareness and encouraging dialogue about mental health – and the founder of #SickNotWeak, a charity that helps build understanding that mental illness is a sickness, not a weakness. 

 

 

 

Conference Schedule

Attendees are welcome to attend the conference in full or in part. 

 

TIME ACTIVITY
12:00 – 12:45 pm Registration
12:45 – 1:00 pm Welcome & Opening Remarks
1:00 – 2:00 pm Opening Keynote - Michael Landsberg
2:00 – 5:00 pm Campus & Community Mental Health Resource Fair
2:15 – 3:30 pm Concurrent Sessions #1
  • What’s The Deal with CBT?
  • Failing Excellently!
  • Navigating Career Uncertainty
  • Peer Perspectives with Sid Smith Commons Assistants
  • Grad Skills: Overcoming Imposter Syndrome
  • Community Voices Listening Session

View session descriptions >

3:45 – 5:00 pm Concurrent Session #2
  • BIPOC Mental Health & Academia
  • Grad Skills: Effective Communication & Conflict Resolution
  • Enhancing Academic Resilience
  • Building Self-Awareness & Boundaries
  • Community Voices Listening Session

View session descriptions >

5:30 – 7:00 pm Closing Keynote - Margaret Trudeau
7:00 – 8:00 pm  Margaret Trudeau Book Signing

 

 

CAMPUS & COMMUNITY MENTAL
HEALTH RESOURCE FAIR

2:00 - 5:00 pm

Situated in the heart of the city, the University of Toronto community is fortunate to have access to a wide array of organizations, services, and resources that support individual and community mental health and wellbeing. In addition to the speakers and sessions available at the conference you can learn about and meet with representatives from many of these organizations.

U of T Resources:

Online & Community Resources:

For additional mental health resources, visit the U of T directory of health and community contacts.

 

For more information about the conference or for accessibility assistance call 416.946.0059 or email c.jankowski@utoronto.ca.

 

 

Concurrent Sessions

 

2:15 – 3:30 pm

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a popular and widespread practice that focuses on recognizing, challenging, and ultimately changing the unhelpful thoughts, beliefs, attitudes and behaviours that negatively impact upon our moods. Although frequently used a part of a treatment plan for depression and anxiety, CBTs contributions to improving emotional regulation and developing personal coping strategies can be of benefit to everyone. This panel explores different perspectives and experiences with this powerful therapeutic practice.

  • Megan Davidson, Psychologist, Health & Wellness Centre
  • Brad Dalgleish, Undergraduate Student, Faculty of Arts & Science
  • Ana Fonseca, Alumna, Human Biology Program
  • Joseph Jay Williams, Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science
  • Sarah Kushner, Graduate Student, Department of Computer Science
  • Charmaine Williams, Acting Vice-Dean of Students, School of Graduate Studies
  • Moderator:  Pamela Klassen, Vice-Dean, Undergraduate & International

Research consistently highlights the importance of failure in learning, but what does it mean to experience failure within an environment that seems to prize excellence above all else? Shedding light on the taboo topic of failure, this panel presents stories of failure, acknowledges the real suffering associated with failure, and explores how belonging to a culture of excellence can challenge our sense of belonging and fuel fears of being an imposter.

  • Poppy Lockwood, Professor, Department of Psychology
  • Nicholas Feinig, Graduate Student, Department of Anthropology
  • Margeaux Feldman, Graduate Student, Department of English
  • Sophia Jit, Alumna, Department of Economics
  • Moderator:  Dwayne Benjamin, Vice-Dean, Graduate Education

Careers are unpredictable and can be overwhelming to navigate. This session explores how we can shift our thinking about uncertainty to better manage career anxiety. Learn strategies that will help you create a flexible career plan that supports your well-being.

  • Kelci Archibald, Career Educator, Career Exploration & Education

Experience the guidance and support of a personalized Peer Perspectives conversation with one of the friendly and knowledgeable Sid Smith Commons Assistants.  Bring your questions and work one-on-one (or in a small group, if you’d prefer) with these knowledgeable students to receive encouragement and inspiration while co-designing an action plan that connects you with academic resources and supports that are a good fit for your unique needs and experiences.  

Ever feel like you don’t deserve to be in grad school?  These feelings of self-doubt are often referred to as “imposter syndrome” and are quite common among graduate students, especially among those who may be first in the family, racialized, mature students, gender non-conforming, or from a group that is underrepresented within academia. In this workshop we will discuss some of the common ways that imposter syndrome can manifest in the graduate experience, reflect on how it can impact your learning and progress, and develop self-awareness strategies that can lessen the impact of these feelings. 

  • Jasjit Sangha, Learning Strategist, Academic Success, Student Life

Through facilitated discussion, this listening session will provide members of the U of T community with an opportunity to offer feedback and comments to inform the work of the Presidential & Provostial Task Force on Student Mental Health. Reflecting upon their own experiences, participants will be invited to share their thoughts and ideas on how to enhance the delivery and coordination of student-centred mental health services.

  • Bonnie Kirsh, Professor, Faculty of Medicine (Student Mental Health Task Force Outreach & Engagement Co-Lead)
  • Caroline Rabbat, Director, Critical Incidents, Safety & Mental Health, A&S (Student Mental Health Task Force Outreach & Engagement Co-Lead)

3:45 – 5:00 pm

On top of the rigours of academia, Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (BIPOC) must endure societal forms of systemic oppression, navigate colonial institutional structures, and confront Eurocentric values that adversely impact upon mental health. This panel provides a forum for discussing mental health realities of marginalized identities, exploring barriers to help-seeking, coping strategies, and the role of community in persisting through adversity and achieving excellence.

  • Rachel La Touche, Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology
  • Krystal Jagoo, Accessibility Advisor, Accessibility Services
  • Sabrina Brathwaite, Undergraduate Student, Department of Philosophy
  • Brenda Wastasecoot, Assistant Professor, Centre for Indigenous Studies
  • Moderator:  Alexie Tcheuyap, Vice-Dean, Faculty, Academic Life & Equity

Join fellow graduate students and G2G Peer Advisors from the Graduate Conflict Resolution Centre (CRC) for an interactive discussion about conflict management tips & strategies that can help you to manage supervisory expectations and set healthy academic boundaries. Information about campus resources and supports that can help you to develop effective communication skills will also be shared. 

  • Tony Luong, G2G Peer Advisor
  • Jessica Thorp, G2G Peer Advisor

This skill-building workshop will help you to enhance your personal and academic resilience by introducing five evidence-based wellbeing practices that help you feel and function better.  Using wellbeing as a foundation, we will then explore three habits that contribute to academic success:  committing to your top priorities, applying evidence-based study practices, and activating resilience when you (inevitably) encounter adversity, challenges and setbacks.  

  • Alysha Bulman, Health Education Coordinator, Health & Wellness Centre
  • Ellyn Kerr, Learning Strategist, Academic Success, Student Life

University life is filled with demands. It can be all too easy to ignore our boundaries and take on more than we should. But determining and asserting our boundaries is key to self-care and mental health, as well as to being successful in academic life. In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to discuss some of the challenges students face when it comes to taking care of our mental health; gain a better understanding of how to harness the power of self-awareness; and learn strategies for assessing and asserting boundaries that support mental health.  

  • Camille de Lacy, Lead Coordinator, Clubs & Leadership Development, SL
  • Margeaux Fieldman, Intern, Leadership Development, Student Life

Through facilitated discussion, this listening session will provide members of the U of T community with an opportunity to offer feedback and comments to inform the work of the Presidential & Provostial Task Force on Student Mental Health.  Reflecting upon their own experiences, participants will be invited to share their thoughts and ideas on how to enhance the delivery and coordination of student-centred mental health services.

  • Bonnie Kirsh, Professor, Faculty of Medicine (Student Mental Health Task Force Outreach & Engagement Co-Lead)
  • Caroline Rabbat, Director, Critical Incidents, Safety & Mental Health, A&S (Student Mental Health Task Force Outreach & Engagement Co-Lead)