Forest Conservation

Forest conservation programs combine traditional ecological and physical sciences with social sciences to address issues of forest conservation such as biodiversity conservation, ecological sustainability, protection of wildlife and other habitats, biofuels and biomaterials and economic sustainability.

 

Admission Information

  • Honours Bachelor of Arts Programs
    • Apply to Social Sciences on the St George campus
    • Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English are required
    • Senior high school Biology is required preparation for first-year
    • Senior high school Geography or one social science credit is recommended
    • Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits
  • Honours Bachelor of Science Programs
    • Apply to Life Sciences on the St George campus
    • Six Grade 12 U or M courses, including English and Calculus and Vectors are required
    • Senior high school Biology is required preparation for first-year
    • Senior high school Chemistry is recommended
    • Students outside of Ontario should have the equivalent senior high school credits

 

Bachelor of Arts Programs

  • Forest Conservation (specialist, major and minor options)

 

Bachelor of Science Programs

  • Forest Conservation (specialist, major and minor options)
  • Forest Biomaterials (major and minor options)

 

First-Year Courses

  • The program does not offer any courses at the first-year level

 

Advice for First Year

Students who are interested in taking any of the Forest Conservation programs should take BIO 120H1 – Adaptation and Biodiversity, plus other specified science or social science courses as indicated in the Calendar for specific programs. These courses are prerequisites for many other courses in the Faculty and are a requirement for the programs in Forest Conservation.

 

Careers

Ten per cent of the complete remaining global forest cover is found in Canada, and protection of our forest ecosystems must play a key role in any global solution. At the same time, use of our forest is still a critical component of the Canadian economy, providing some 40 billion dollars in exports each year, and supporting more than 900 communities across the country. As a society, we must find more effective ways of using forests, while protecting their social, environmental and spiritual values.

Forest conservation must be based on sound knowledge of forest ecology, but it also requires understanding of complex social, communal, political and economic issues. There is an increasing need in all environment and resource management fields for graduates, like those of forest conservation programs, who combine broad literacy in related disciplines with specialized expertise in selected areas such as forest ecology, wildlife management, aboriginal land tenure issues, or communal economics.

Graduates make careers in a wide range of fields, including federal and provincial environment and resource management departments, private consultancies, the forest products industry, industrial associations and wood products research facilities, regional conservation authorities and non-governmental environmental organizations such as the World Wildlife Fund, Canada, and the Wildlands League. Many work as key members of multi-disciplinary research teams. Increasingly graduates also work in international development with organizations such as the United Nations Environmental Program, Food and Agricultural Organization, the Forest Stewardship Council and development NGOs. Programs also provide an excellent foundation for graduate studies in forestry, or in a range of related natural and social science disciplines.

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