CCR199H1

2017-18 First-Year Seminars | CCR199H1: Creative and Cultural Representations (Category 1)

A few First-Year Seminars give preference during the first round of enrolment to students with membership in the college offering the course - if this is the case, the college name will be listed beside the course title. During the second round of enrolment, first-year students at any college may enroll if space is available.

Refer to the 2017-18 Arts & Science Timetable for the schedule information of each offering.

CCR 199H1F: Creative and Cultural Representations (Category 1): 2017 Fall Offerings 

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Section Number Title College
L0021 Digital Media / Digital Makers University
L0191 Canadian Children's Books: the Groundwood Archive  
L0211 Public Art  
L0212 Marco Polo's World  
L0221 Pleasure, Pain and Nostalgia in Belle Époque  
L0251 Our Vampires, Ourselves  
L0252 Common Humanity  
L0271 Of Journey and Voyages  
L0301 Iranian Women Reveal Their Lives: A First Generation  
L0321 Multiculturalism, Philosophy, and Film (with MOVIE SCREENING)  
L0331 Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours Woodsworth
L0371 On Foot: Cultural Histories of Walking  
L0381 The Criminal Mind  
L0382 The Cossacks  
L0383 Literature and Painting in Russia and the West  

CCR 199H1S: Creative and Cultural Representations (Category 1): 2018 Winter Offerings 

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Section Number Title College
L0021 Comics, Graphic Novels and the New Visual Culture University
L0091 Hoboes, Geniuses, and Immigrants: Otherness in Contemporary Culture Innis
L0141 Pastoral Literature in Antiquity and Beyond  
L0171 Chinese Aesthetics and Art Criticism  
L0172 Orality and Literacy 2.0  
L0191 Reading and Writing Short Fiction  
L0211 Art and the Mind's Eye  
L0251 Cities, Real and Imagined  
L0271 Italian Culture from Renaissance to Baroque  
L0272 "The Fine Art of Murder: Reading Detective Fiction"  
L0301 Babylon: Fact versus Fiction  
L0302 Transmissions of the Knowledge in the Ancient World  
L0303 Iranian Women Write Their Lives: The Young Generation  
L0331 Virtual Worlds: Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities Woodsworth
L0381 The Slavic Grecian Formula: From Ancient Rhapsode to Modern Rap Song  

CCR 199H1F: 2017 Fall Offerings

CCR 199H1F | Section L0021 | University College

Digital Media / Digital Makers
Innovation in digital media has democratized access to online tools and platforms and students today can contribute directly to Digital Humanities research. By exploring Canadian online academic archives and resources, students will reflect critically on the impact, advantages and limitations of the shift to digital texts, and how digital tools, techniques, and media forms are altering how knowledge is produced and disseminated in the humanities and social sciences. We will work with text analysis tools in order to understand how quantitative methods can support critical academic research in a range of disciplines, including but not limited to literary, historical, and cultural studies. Guest speakers will discuss their projects and design strategies. Students will produce original research and contribute to a collaborative class project archived online. The project focus could be: quantitative text analysis; an interactive map app; or exploring game design and multi-media games as tools for academic engagement.

Instructor: S. O’Flynn, University College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0191

Canadian Children’s Books: the Groundwood Archive
What goes into the creation of Canadian culture, particularly Canadian literature, for children? Do children’s books emerge illustrious and complete from the brains of their creators? We’ll use the Groundwood Archives and other holdings in the Osborne Collection at Toronto Public Library to explore these questions. Original manuscripts, illustrations, drafts, editorial correspondence, design decisions, reviews, fan letters — we’ll look at them all in relation to works by some of Canada’s foremost writers and illustrators for kids (Brian Doyle, Marie-Louise Gay, Sarah Ellis etc.). How do the publisher’s aesthetic and political aims, its ideas about children and the market, play out in the works it produces? How do the behind-the-scenes conversations between writers, artists, editors and designers affect work that ultimately becomes formative for young readers? What can reviews, fan letters and post-publication material tell us about Canadian culture for children?

Instructor: D. Baker, English
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0211

Public Art in Toronto
We are surrounded by public art that covers the spectrum from official commemorative monuments to illegal street art. We will examine the history and current practice of this form internationally and in Toronto. The focus will be on discussing the nature and issues pertaining to original works in situ.

Instructor: M. Cheetham, Department of Art
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0212

Marco Polo’s World
This course explores the visual and material world described in Marco Polo’s Travels. Using close readings of the text, it introduces students to the global world of the Middle Ages. In particular, the course attends to the study of art and architecture in this expansive medieval world.

Instructor: J. Purtle, Department of Art
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0221

Pleasure, Pain and Nostalgia in Belle Époque
The delightfully simple “joie de vivre” of Parisian music-halls and cabarets fascinated the Western world and art took new forms with Impressionism and Art Nouveau during “La belle époque”, a period in European history that began during the late 19th century and lasted until World War I. This course will explore ideas and cultural representations through examples of French art, philosophy, and literature with an emphasis on the critical discussion of two literary narratives that challenged tradition and authority: Gustave Flaubert, “Madame Bovary”; Guy de Maupassant, “Bel-ami”. The literary themes of “guilt” and “self-quest” as well as the inherent philosophical tension between “pleasure” and “guilt” will be analyzed in the context of the bohemian culture of “La belle époque”. Multimedia presentations and selections from Fernando Trueba’s 1992 film “Belle époque” will supplement the reading material in the course.
Required texts: Flaubert -“Madame Bovary”, Maupassant - “Bel-ami”, Film: “Belle époque” (Fernando Trueba, 1992).
A selection of course notes and multimedia presentations will be available via Blackboard.
In-class test (35%); Take-home essay (30%); Final in-class essay (25%); Overall assessment (10%).

Instructor: M. A. Visoi, French
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0251

Our Vampires, Ourselves
Vampires is among the most fascinating figures of popular culture. Since Stoker’s Dracula – in fact well before that – they have been haunting the human imagination in various shapes and forms. This course examines the figure of the vampire as a potent cultural metaphor showing how every age embraces the vampires it needs and gets the vampires it deserves. The goal is to teach students to reflect critically and independently on issues of self and society and to develop a structured approach to critical thinking in general.

Instructor: E. Boran, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0252

Common Humanity
Since antiquity, philosophers and writers have struggled to understand what humans have in common. Starting in the Enlightenment and moving to present day debates on humanity in post-racialized societies, we will ask what common humanity means.

Instructor: J. Noyes, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0271

Of Journeys and Voyages
Journeys have always fascinated readers and captivated young minds since the beginning of time. Authors have repeatedly made use of this time-honoured trope to articulate the process through which individual transformations are achieved or personal quests are initiated. Whether metaphoric or real, journeys are invariably compelling. They take many forms. They can be emotional, sentimental, sexual and educational. They may be personal and deal with one person's attempts to arrive at a particular level of enlightenment or they may be collective and help mobilize nationalistic fervour against a particular enemy or foe. Whatever their form, journeys create adventure, excitement and self-fulfilment. This course looks at the tradition of travel literature in European literary production since the discovery of the New World. Through literary and social analysis of the most representative works, the course will trace the vital aspects of the “journey” as a structuring motif and will also illustrate the most influential travel accounts of the time.

Instructor: B. Magliocchetti, Italian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0301

Iranian Women Reveal Their Lives: A First Generation
The narrative of women speaking out begins in Iran in the first decades of the 20th century. In this course, we will look at an early generation of educated Iranian females who although from varied backgrounds have a common desire to make their lives public. We will refer to a mix of sources including memoirs, interviews and poems to explore how feminist aspirations are repressed or expressed in a society dominated by patriarchal values. We will analyse how a woman’s childhood experience affects her personal expectations for the future and whether the cultural environment restricted this generation or encouraged women to make a social contribution. First year seminars encourage a variety of opportunities for students to participate. Involvement in class discussion, oral presentations and written assignments are components of the marking scheme and encourage engagement with the course materials.

Instructor: R. Sandler, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0321

Multiculturalism, Philosophy, and Film (with MOVIE SCREENING)
This course will critically examine the role of cinema in the construction and exploration of the figure of the racial, ethnic, cultural and social “other”. Our topics will include (1) racial, ethnic and cultural identity and its reciprocal relationship with cinema, (2) the notion of realism in relation to the representation of race and ethnicity in film, (3) the cinematic representation of inter-ethnic and intra-ethnic conflict, (4) the position of cinema in the debate between assimilation and multiculturalism, and (5) the ways in which cinema can help illuminate a cluster of relevant notions in political philosophy including citizenship, communitarianism, cosmopolitanism, and the relation between individual rights and group rights. Films will be screened in class and discussed against the background of focused critical readings.

Instructor: F. Gagliardi, Philosophy
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0331 | Woodsworth College

Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice in Her Time and Ours
Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen’s 1813 novel about spirited Elizabeth Bennet and forbidding Mr. Darcy, has been admired by critics and readers since its publication. The novel rewards study both for its own sake—a model of English prose fiction and a revealing image of England on the threshold of modernity—and for what its contemporary popularity reveals about our time, which has witnessed an outpouring of retellings and adaptations of the novel since a highly successful 1995 BBC television production starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth. The principal question explored in the seminar is the extent to which Austen’s original story survives in contemporary versions. Works studied will include Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, screen adaptations of the novel, and text and screen works based on Pride and Prejudice, including Bridget Jones’s Diary.

Instructor: T. Moritz, Woodsworth College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0371

On Foot: Cultural Histories of Walking
This course explores how historical, cultural, and spatial contexts shape practices of walking. Students will analyze representations of walking in literature, religion, philosophy, and art, and investigate connections between walking, thinking, and writing. Topics include knowing place and landscape through movement, religious and secular walking pilgrimages, literary representations of nature walks, orienteering and recreational hiking, urban walking tours, and the many aesthetic, political and social uses of walking. We will focus in particular on routes around Toronto, exploring indigenous footpaths such as the Davenport trail and the Humber Portage. Coursework will combine required reading and writing with substantial periods of time walking outside, and students will be required to keep a walking journal throughout the semester.

Instructor: M. Price, Study of Religion
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0381

The Criminal Mind
In the second half of the nineteenth century, fiction on both sides of the Atlantic became obsessed with the subject of criminals and criminality. This course examines the nature of this preoccupation and explores the reasons behind it as well as its literary and social ramifications. Topics include the criminal as social deviant, the novelistic narrator as criminologist, crime in the city and in the provinces, political crimes, sexual crimes, and changing interpretations of the causes of crime. Readings include novels by Dostoevsky and Zola, stories by Poe and Stevenson and non-fictional writings by the Italian criminologist Lombroso.

Instructor: K. Holland, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR199H1F | Section L0382

The Cossacks
The Cossacks were any number of things in fact--indeed, the term can be applied to different groups of people--but they were even more in fiction. This course surveys the representation of Cossacks in literary works ranging across a wide variety of cultures and eras. Were the Cossacks Russian, Polish, Ukrainian or all of the above? Were they the agents of a repressive Russian government, the hirelings of Polish kings, the tormentors of East European Jews, the protectors of Europe from the Ottomans, or the liberators of the Ukrainian nation? Were they East European cowboys, legendary warriors, defenders of Orthodox Christianity, or a motley collection of drunken mercenaries? We will survey depictions of Cossacks in works of folklore, and in literary works by Russian, Polish, Jewish, and Ukrainian writers.

Instructor: M. Tarnawsky, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1F | Section L0383

Literature and Painting in Russia and the West
In his Six Memos for the Millennium, Italo Calvino, one of the 20th century's foremost writers, writes about the 'visibility' of literature as one of its most important virtues. What makes literature 'visible'? How do the verbal and the visual coexist? This seminar explores the relationship between words and images, texts and pictures through history, in Russia and the West. Special attention will be paid to the figure of the artist. Is it a writer's alter ego, the incarnation of creativity, or just a character among others? Literary texts (mainly short stories) from Balzac and Gogol to Chekhov and O. Henry, Maugham and Bunin, Nabokov and Camus will be studied along with the paintings of some major 19th-20th century artists. The comparative dimension of the course will help students contextualize Russian literature and think about its relationship with the Western canon. We will also watch some 21st century films about artists (such as Julie Taymor's Frida [2002], Milos Forman Goya's Ghosts [2006], and, most recent, Mike Leigh Mr. Turner [2014]). All texts will be in English.

Instructor: T. Smoliarova, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S: 2018 Winter Offerings

CCR 199H1S | Section L0021 | University College

Comics, Graphic Novels and the New Visual Culture
Comics, graphic novels, and other forms of visual culture (such as video and anime) are now considered objects for serious study. In this introductory course, we will examine the various genres of visual art which combine the visual and the textual, and the rhetorical uses of visual culture in order to think through important questions within various subgenres: short narratives, auto/biography, the superhero, multimedia, and film (wherever possible). In particular, we will explore the following questions: To what rhetorical purposes are the things that comprise visual culture used? How is “truth” represented/constructed through visual, textual, and multimodal rhetoric? In pursuing these questions, we will consider the history of visual culture, look at how both history and current events are represented in those cultures, and consider the interplay of literature and various visual arts.

Instructor: A. Lesk, University College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0091 | Innis College

Hoboes, Geniuses, and Immigrants: Otherness in Contemporary Culture
Hoboes, geniuses, and immigrants all share a sense of Otherness in terms of their identity because they are different from the norm. This course analyzes the factors that create the sense of Otherness in an individual. Can Otherness be chosen as an identity or is it imposed by society? What conditions make Otherness a positive or negative experience? Instances of Otherness are analyzed in contemporary novels and films. The course focuses on the immigrant experience and on the issue of sexual identity.

Instructor: J. Paterson, Innis College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0141

Pastoral Literature in Antiquity and Beyond

At the heart of this seminar will be close reading of pastoral genre poetry (exemplified in antiquity by the Idylls of Theocritus and the Eclogues of Virgil), a genre which features singing shepherds, frisky lambkins, and a highly stylized natural landscape. This poetic genre was also popular in post-antiquity, and we will certainly survey notable examples of it. But we will also explore other perspectives on the pastoral, which fundamentally involves spatial (urban/rural) and cultural (civilized/uncivilized) divisions. The tone of literary description of pastoralism varies widely. Pastoral poetry seemingly celebrates shepherds, if in a patronizing manner, as a counterpoint to corrupt urban centers. But there also exist stereotypes of the pastoralist and nomad as a barbaric and threatening “Other”. After discussing pastoralism as a socio-economic livelihood, we will read and discuss various literary portrayals of the non-urban lifestyle in ancient literature (including the Cyclops Polyphemus in the Odyssey and Euripides; exotic nomads in Herodotus) and in modern literature (for example, Walden by Thoreau; Songlines by Bruce Chatwin). Finally, we will read descriptions of Modern Greek pastoralists by modern sociologists and travel writers. Class will feature discussion of the readings. There will be a short weekly essay on the readings, with feedback designed to improve writing skills, and a 10 page paper due at the end of the semester.

Instructor: J. Burgess, Classics
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0171

 

Chinese Aesthetics and Art Criticism
This seminar focuses on different visions and methods leading to the sense of beauty in Chinese arts by examining various theoretical texts on music, painting, calligraphy, and literature, in the form of special treatises and as recorded in the Classics. The purpose of the theoretical discussion and textual analysis is to provide students with knowledge of Chinese arts and research skills on the aesthetic values in Chinese culture and their development along Chinese intellectual history. Questions to be addressed include: How should we understand the concepts of art and Chinese art? What is the role of the art and the artist in Chinese culture? What are the criteria of classification and evaluation of art? How to become a Master Painter? What are the political and social functions of art education? We will discuss the aesthetic meaning of Chinese poetry, calligraphy, music, and ritual, Chinese Garden and the beauty of landscape (shanshui, or Mountain and Water).

Instructor: J. Liu, East Asian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0172

Orality and Literacy 2.0
How do we understand sound in a largely visual world? This seminar takes Walter Ong’s celebrated conceptual binary of “orality and literacy” and examines its modern updates in our increasingly high-tech culture. Situating “orality and literacy 2.0” in modern East Asia, we listen closely to East Asia as a changing body of soundscapes and explore its technological, cultural, and political undertone.

Instructor: J. Liu, East Asian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0191

Reading and Writing Short Fiction
A seminar devoted to the craft of writing short stories, with an emphasis on learning from the study of published fiction. In our discussions of stories by contemporary writers, we’ll adopt an evaluative and analytical approach, drawing on narratology and other literary criticism to discuss how short stories work and achieve their effects. Topics will include perspective, character, voice, rhythm, figurative language, dialogue, setting, and plot. The assignments will involve students writing short fiction while engaging with genres, techniques, and strategies addressed in class.
Required Reading
A course reader featuring short fiction by authors such as Donald Barthelme, Angela Carter, Michael Crummey, Don DeLillo, Veronica Geng, A. M. Homes, Kazuo Ishiguro, Denis Johnson, Jamaica Kincaid, Rohinton Mistry, Lorrie Moore, Alice Munro, Tim O’Brien, Annie Proulx, George Saunders, Lore Segal, Yasuko Thanh, and Charles Yu; criticism by authors such as Margaret Atwood, J. M. Coetzee, Lenore Keeshig-Tobias, Gary Lutz, and James Wood.
Method of Evaluation
Class participation (10%); online participation (10%); class presentation (5%); three short stories (35%); two quizzes (20%); in-class test (20%).

Instructor: R. McGill, English
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0211

Art and the Mind’s Eye
“True philosophy is to learn again to see the world.” Aphorisms like this one by the philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty connect knowledge and understanding to vision – to what is visible, what is invisible, and what is newly visible. Questions about how artists, and their viewers, see and understand the world have accordingly intersected with various philosophical and scientific inquiries into the nature of optics and visual perception. Through the lenses of epistemology, phenomenology, psychology, and neurology, this course will open students’ eyes to the complex and unexpected ways of seeing Western art from the Renaissance to modern day. Each week will focus on select readings in combination with a particular image, object, or film, and some weeks will involve class excursions to local sites and sights.

Instructor: C. Murray, History of Art
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0251

Cities, Real and Imagined
They pulse with life, bringing together people from different class, gender, and ethnic backgrounds, simultaneously giving rise to a sense of freedom and oppression, a sense of belonging and alienation. This course will explore the city as a physical reality that shapes our lives, but is also a projection of our deepest imaginings. Through readings of philosophical and sociological texts by influential theorists of the city, we will consider various ancient and modern conceptions of urban space and subjectivity. Alongside these theoretical readings, we will also examine literary and filmic representations of the city as a space of desire, memory and power.

Instructor: H. Kim, Germanic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0271

Italian Culture from Renaissance to Baroque
The course focuses on the cultural shift from Renaissance to Baroque including Literature, Architecture, Arts and Music. Focusing on Florence for the Renaissance and on Rome for the Baroque, particular attention is devoted to Mannerism as a transitional / hybrid period ( from Raffaello and Andrea del Sarto to Rosso Fiorentino and Pontormo, Vasari, Bronzino etc.), to the explosion of Baroque architecture (Borromini and Bernini) and poetry (from Tasso to Marino and the Marinisti), to Monteverdi’s madrigals of seconda pratica. All literary texts will be in English translation.

Instructor: F. Guardiani, Italian Studies
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S Section L0272

“The Fine Art of Murder: Reading Detective Fiction”
Since its inception in the Nineteenth century, detective fiction has been one of the most popular literary genres, immediately recognizable in spite of the many changes it has undergone. While Sherlock Holmes, with his scientific approach to investigation, remains one of its most enduring archetypes, he has little in common with the morally complex private eyes of the “noir,” with the cops of the procedural novel, or with the socially engaged sleuths of feminist mysteries, to name just a few permutations of the figure of the detective. This course will explore the many faces of detective fiction, addressing questions such as: Why does crime hold such a fascination for modern audiences? What kind of pleasure do we derive from reading stories that often follow established conventions and rules? What do these novels about crime and punishment tell us about broader social and political issues?

Instructor: L. Somigli, Italian Studies,
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0301

Babylon: Fact versus Fiction
The ancient city of Babylon, now a vast archaeological site in Iraq about 100km south of Baghdad, has captured people’s imagination up to this day. Who has not heard of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Biblical Tower of Babel, or the sci-fi TV series Babylon 5? Yet, how much of that reflects the reality of ancient Babylon? This course will explore the city of Babylon through its texts and archaeology and contrast this data with the way the city has been remembered over the past two thousand years. However, the goal of the course is not only to investigate how myths about Babylon have been constructed throughout the centuries. It will also look at the shortcomings of contemporary academic research on Babylon, and how difficult it is to reconstruct humankind’s distant past.

Instructor: P. Beaulieu, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0302

Transmissions of Knowledge in the Ancient World
This course investigates how scribal and intellectual knowledge may have been transmitted in the ancient Near East. Looking at archival and library records it examines the role of the scribes in palace and temple economies and tries to determine to what extent their multilingualism contributed to a transmission of knowledge. As a diachronic study the course identifies overarching information, or metadata, which demonstrate the transfer of knowledge in a process of adoption and adaptation of scribal practices across social, linguistic, and political boundaries in a historical continuum. It demonstrates the need of any given political entity for an ethnic identity, expressed in the need for one’s own language and script, via the initial adoption of a foreign language and/or script. The vehicle to find that political and cultural voice are professionally trained scribes, attested throughout ancient civilizations from fourth millennium B.C. Uruk to seventh century AD Bactra.

Instructor: M. Brosius, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0303

Iranian Women Write Their Lives: A Young Generation 
The narrative of the young generation of Iranian women discussed in this course begins with the 1979 Revolution in Iran.  These are ‘the children of the revolution”, young women who were born in Iran and whose parents due to circumstances beyond their control left behind the land of their birth to make a new home for themselves and their children in North America. A few young women satisfy a longing for the world of their childhood by returning to Iran as young adults. Deeply marked by the actions of their parents a young generation uses the format of the memoir to reassert control over their lives and to explore their issues of identity and belonging. Seminar discussion focuses on their memoirs. First year seminars encourage a variety of opportunities for students to participate. Involvement in class discussion, oral presentations and written assignments are components of the marking scheme.  

Instructor: R. Sandler, Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations
Breadth Category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0331 | Woodsworth College

Virtual World: Introduction to Spatial Digital Humanities
From Facebook and Pokémon to digital museum archives, medical files, and climate research records, the data deluge of the twenty-first century presents many new challenges. How do we distil stories and insights from the deluge of data? How do we preserve our digital cultural heritage as its size and diversity grow? How do we participate in and understand digital cultures with rigour, nuance, and ethics? In this course, you will learn about digital humanities (DH), an emerging discipline at the intersections of the humanities with computing. DH investigates culture—literature, philosophy, history, art, music—through digital tools and platforms. At the same time, DH investigates digital tools and cultures through humanist lenses, examining how the digital shapes, and is shaped by, its wider cultural context. Besides learning about the history and intellectual landscape of DH, you will learn best practices in data curation, project management, and digital development. And in hands-on, instructor-led workshops, you will learn to use digital technologies to create your own projects, from multimedia narratives and video games to 3D printed objects and digital archives.

Instructor: A. Bolintineau, Woodsworth College
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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CCR 199H1S | Section L0381

The Slavic Grecian Formula: From Ancient Rhapsode to Modern Rap Song
Slavic singers of oral epics about war, lust, honour and revenge have made a special contribution to our appreciation of classical literature and mythology. We will read heroic tales from Russia, Bosnia, Croatia, and Serbia. Recent research shows that they share much, in melody and message, with the songs of today's hip-hop artists, whose roots of rap "flowing" reach back to the beginnings of Western literature and the rhapsodes of ancient Greece. This connection is based on performance theory about modern-day Slavic "Homers." As we read Homer's Iliad closely, we will study Slavic epics and listen to African-American rap songs to learn how and why they were composed. Students will experience a multimedia, hyperlinked eEdition of an oral performance by a traditional Slavic epic singer. No knowledge of languages other than English is required.

Instructor: R. Bogert, Slavic Languages and Literatures
Breadth category: 1 Creative and Cultural Representations

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